The 16 remaining original Victorian era pubs of Dublin

Millions of people flock to Dublin every year for a chance to see up close, just what makes a Dublin pub so special. For most, the older the better. There is no shortage of authentically traditional pubs in the city, but as the decades go by, the numbers drop. Some of the best pubs in Dublin were built in the Victorian era, which stretched from 1837 to 1901. Many of these remain to this day and retain the majority of their original fixtures and their Victorian characteristics.

In Kevin C. Kearns’ ‘Dublin pub life and lore’, he lists the remaining Victorian pubs still in operation today. Sincethe book was published, 2 have closed down, Conways on Parnell street and Regans on Tara street. Here we will go through the remaining pubs and just why they are worth preserving and why they are part of Dublin’s rich heritage and remain some of the best places to go for a pint.

Interesting to note is that most of these pubs have snugs, which are a rare sight in modern pubs.

The Palace bar, Fleet street

palace

The Palace bar is still richly celebrated as one of the most traditional bars in the city, drawing in tourists from the Temple Bar area looking for a more authentic experience. A pub where writers, journalists, artists, and others have congregated for decades. They still have a great tradition of supporting the GAA and traditional music. They have a lovely traditional snug and have moved with the times by offering a good selection of Irish craft beer.

Toners, Baggot street

toners

Toners has a reputation of having one of the best pints of Guinness in the city according to Rory Guinness, a descendant of Arthur. It still retains its character on the inside and they have tried to recreate it in their newer beer garden. The snug was in recent years voted best in the country.

Doheny and Nesbitt, Baggot street

doheny

A pub mostly associated with journalists and the local business crowd, Dohenys is still very much traditional. It’s a big rugby pub, and they also have traditional music from Sunday to Tuesday nights.

 

The Swan, Aungier street

One of our favourite pubs in the city. The fixtures remain the same, and they proudly boast of their status as a Victorian era heritage pub. You can still see signs behind the bar that advertise ‘Colour TV available here’ from when the bar started to modernise in terms of what they offer.

 

The Long Hall, Georges street

One of the quintessential Dublin pubs for those visiting and looking for a bit of tradition. Bruce Springsteen is known to drink here when he’s in town, and who could argue with his taste. The walls are decorated with muskets, antique clocks, and other period paraphernalia. A Dublin classic.

 

Slatterys, Capel street

Slatterys is listed in the book as being a Victorian era pub, but there have been some recent renovations. These were mostly of the upper floor, so it shouldn’t affect the pubs Victorian status. It is also one of the few remaining early houses in the city, opening early in the morning for those who work unsociable hours.

 

The Stag’s Head, Dame Lane

stags

The jewel in the crown of the Louis Fitzgerald pub group, and one of the most recognisable pub names in the city. There’s a large snug room behind the bar that is extremely cosy and retains a stained glass ceiling. If you see footage of the pub from the 60s and 70s you could barely tell the difference to today, bar the increase in taps on the counter.

 

Ryans, Parkgate street

ryansparkgate

Also known as Bongo Ryans, it has one of the most sought after snugs in the city. Like all Victorian pubs, it features large ornately carved wooden dividers that break up the bar.

 

The International Bar, Exchequer street

Best known as the home of stand up comedy in the city. The main bar is quite a small space, but it’s one of the most homely in the city.

Gaffneys, Fairview

The Hut, Phibsboro

Bowes, Fleet street

bowesfront

Bowes recently reopened their new snug after a bit of a refurb. Plans were underway to expand the bar into the neighbouring Doyles and ladbrokes, but the planning permission was turned down. this may well be a good thing for admirers of Bowes, as it will retain all the makes it good.

Kehoes, South Anne street

Such is the popularity of Kehoes, it can be hard to get a seat in this well worn and well loved pub. When full, it can appear to be a bit of a mazey design, with creaking stairs taking you to areas you wouldn’t expect existed. The snug beside the bar to the left as you walk in is a fine place to meet with friends.

Finnegans, Dalkey

 

Cassidys, Camden street

Come in here on a Sunday after an All Ireland final and you’ll fear for the safety of the structure! It heaves with fans adoring both the victorious Dubs and this fine pub. Bill Clinton stopped in here for a pint in the 90s on a presidential visit.

 

The Norseman, East Essex street

When the book we are referencing from was published, this pub was known as The Norseman, it then became Farringtons, and it has now reverted back to The Norseman. A fine treat for visitors to Temple Bar to be able to have a pint in an original Victorian era pub.

There are a number of other pubs that have strong characteristics of the Victorian age, but are not clasically Victorian, including…

  • Mulligans Poolbeg street
  • Mulligans Stoneybatter
  • Hanlons North Circular road
  • Kavanaghs Aughrim street
  • The Gravediggers Glasnevin
  • McDaids Harry street
  • The Lord Edward Christchurch
  • The Portobello Rathmines
  • Slatterys Rathmines
  • The Brazen Head Bridge street
  • Searsons Baggot street
  • Sandyford House

 

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Guinness Storehouse voted Europe’s leading tourist attraction

Dublin's Guinness Storehouse has been named ‘Europe’s leading tourist attraction’ at the prestigious World Travel Awards.
The award was presented at a European Gala Ceremony in Sardinia this weekend.

Dublin - Guinness Storehouse
It saw the popular city attraction beat off big hits including the Acropolis in Athens, Buckingham Palace, Barcelona’s La Sagrada Familia, the Roman Colosseum and the Eiffel Tower to achieve first place.
The World Travel Awards, now in their 22nd year, are decided by open vote and widely hailed as ‘the Oscars of the travel industry’.

“We wish to claim this as a victory for Irish tourism,” said Paul Carty, Managing Director of the Guinness Storehouse, speaking at the Sardinia event.
“One in every two holidaymakers to Dublin visits the Guinness Storehouse, and we are very aware and very proud of our position at the front line of the warm Irish welcome.”

The award comes in a rebound year for Irish tourism, with overseas visitors up 11.7pc between January and June alone, according to CSO figures.
“Since its opening, the Guinness Storehouse has become a truly iconic and ‘must visit’ attraction for overseas visitors to Dublin,” said Niall Gibbons, CEO of Tourism Ireland.
The Storehouse welcomed 1.3 million visitors last year, but a record summer has put it on course to surpass that figure in 2015, Carty says.

“To date this year, we have welcomed almost one million visitors, and we hope to be able to break last year’s record by the end of the year,” he told Independent Travel.
Other attractions vying for the World title will be announced shortly, with regional winners competing in the World Travel Awards Grand Final this December 12th.

Dublin - Guinness Storehouse St Patrick
Source

World Travel Awards:
http://www.worldtravelawards.com/award-europes-leading-tourist-attraction-2015

A-Z OF DUBLIN

Ha Penny Bridge
With students wanting to travel further and further afield nowadays, it would be easy for most to overlook visiting Dublin. However there’s every reason to explore the Republic of Ireland’s lively capital, especially if you’re a fan of Guinness. With this in mind Impact travel lists its top attractions in Dublin:

GUINNESS STOREHOUSE

Whether a fan of the Irish stout or not, the Guinness Storehouse is Dublin’s most loved tourist attraction. Located on seven floors at St. James’s Gate Brewery, highlights include a step by step guide of the brewing process, an insight into the company’s advertising and sponsorship campaigns, and an opportunity to pour the perfect pint. Make sure you finish your visit relaxing over a glass of the black stuff in the Gravity Bar where you can admire panoramic views of the city.

NATIONAL GALLERY OF IRELAND

For art lovers, a trip to the National Gallery of Ireland is essential. The museum’s collection includes 2,500 paintings and 10,000 other works of some of the world’s most famous names, such as Caravaggio, van Gogh and Monet. There’s also major works from Irish artists Jack B. Yeats and Louis le Brocquy, and to top that off, it’s free to visit too.

ST. PATRICK’S DAY FESTIVAL

Remarkably, people celebrate St. Patrick’s Day all over the world, and whilst there is much fun to be had in drinking an overpriced, warm pint of Guinness in a wannabe Irish pub halfway across the world, why not celebrate it in Ireland’s capital? They don’t just celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in Dublin either; they make a whole weekend of it, with the highlight being the St. Patrick’s Day Parade. Next year’s celebration takes place on the 14th-17th of March.

BOOK OF KELLS AND TRINITY COLLEGE

For those of you who love exploring the history of a city, make sure you see the Book of Kells. The manuscript can be found in the Old Library at Trinity College and contains the four Gospels of the New Testament, all written in Latin. Afterwards take a walk around the grounds of Trinity College – Dublin’s equivalent to Oxford and Cambridge universities.

KILMAINHAM GAOL

Chosen by Trip Advisor as the top attraction in Ireland for 2014, a trip to Dublin won’t be complete until you visit Kilmainham Gaol. Formerly a prison, it is now a museum where visitors can take a tour of the spooky location and learn about how it played a crucial role in Ireland gaining independence.

FOOD

Part of the joy of visiting other cities has to be trying all the local delicacies on offer. One traditional hearty Dublin dish is the Coddle: a sausage, bacon, onion and potato hot pot. Expect to also find a wealth of Guinness based stews, pies and cakes, and make sure you warm up with an Irish coffee on cold days.

Phoenix Park
PARKS

Take a walk around the beautiful deer-filled Phoenix Park, home to Dublin Zoo and Áras an Uachtaráin; the official residence of the president of Ireland. Entrance to the park is free, however there is a charge to visit the zoo. If you want to go to a more central park, head to St Stephen’s Green, and visit the Shopping Centre while you’re there if you’re in need of some retail therapy.

DUBLINIA

Dublinia is an interactive museum based upon Dublin’s Viking and Medieval history. The museum is a fun way to learn about the city’s past and includes special Halloween exhibits, as well as various living history events and themed exhibitions throughout the year.

Aviva Stadium
SPORT

Dublin is a great sporting city and the perfect place to watch a game. The Aviva Stadium, which opened in 2010, is the home of Ireland’s national football and rugby teams. It will also host four matches in Euro 2020, so there’s every opportunity to watch some of the best sports stars in the world. If you’re up for an unusual experience, head to Croke Park for some Gaelic football, or if sport isn’t your thing, take the Skyline Tour where you can enjoy fantastic views of the city from five viewing platforms.

BARS

If you’re unsure about where to spend your evenings in Dublin, head to the Temple Bar district. Here the pubs and clubs are focused around tourists, so expect slightly inflated drinks prices. Try the area in the day and you’ll find a wealth of cultural attractions, from stunning architecture to one of Ireland’s smallest theatres; The New Theatre, and a wealth of galleries and arts centres.

 

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36 Hours in Dublin by the New-York Times

Video link

After decades of tumultuous change, a more refined wave of affluence has reached Dublin, where visitors will find a restaurant renaissance, musical creativity and a glorious sense of history.
Video by Fritzie Andrade, Max Cantor, Chris Carmichael and Aaron Wolfe on November 12, 2014. 

Dublin’s been through tumultuous change in recent decades, from the Celtic Tiger years, when BMWs were de rigueur, to the post-crash depression, when the cacophony of incessant building suddenly went silent. Today, signs of economic recovery are emerging, but it’s a more refined wave of affluence than what the flashy boom years had to offer. The city is finding a new way to exist — neither ostentatious with wealth nor bowed down under debt. A hugely popular bike share program has replaced the “beamers,” craft beer is gaining precedence over elaborate cocktails, and Dublin restaurants are undergoing a creative renaissance that prioritizes imagination and Irish ingredients over heavily stylized and overpriced dishes. Throughout it all, from its centuries-old pubs to its Georgian architecture to the stately Trinity College at its center, the city has retained its glorious sense of history.

Friday

1. ­Begin in the Bog | 3 p.m.

National Museum of Ireland

The National Museum of Ireland on Kildare Street (free admission) is worth multiple visits, thanks to a well-signed archaeological collection that provides an excellent background for a visit to Ireland. Bronze Age gold jewelry dug up during turf cutting, Viking swords and medieval farming tools are all on display in this handsomely decorated Palladian structure that dates back to 1890. The stars of the show, however, are the “bog people” — preserved corpses of men who were killed (presumably sacrificed) and tossed into peat bogs during the Iron Age. The preservative qualities of the bogs ensured that the bodies are in remarkable condition — one still has nearly a full head of curly hair.

2. ­ Craft on Draft | 5:30 p.m.

The craft beer scene has exploded in the last few years, with bottles of Irish-made lagers, ales, stouts and ciders now standard issue at almost every city watering hole. For one of the biggest selections of craft brews, head to Against the Grain, an unpretentious pub on Wexford Street with hundreds of offerings, including Irish-made bottles from O’Hara’s, Eight Degrees Brewing and Mac Ivors. The pub is owned by the Galway Bay Brewery, which produces its own range of delectable drafts.

3. ­ French-Irish Cuisine | 8 p.m.

The Green Hen, a much-lauded restaurant on buzzy Exchequer Street, has won many admirers with its combination of French atmosphere and Franco-Irish cuisine made with locally sourced ingredients. Try the pan-fried duck breast, which comes with a purée of parsnips and a celeriac mash, and be sure to order a side of bread, a moist, dark version of classic Irish wheaten bread, made with Guinness and black treacle. Dinner for two, about 80 euros, or about $100, at $1.21 to the euro.

4. ­Late-Night Tipple | 10:30 p.m.

Down the street from the Green Hen is Fallon & Byrne, a hybrid food hall, deli, restaurant and wine shop, housed in a former ­telephone exchange, that specializes in high-quality produce and artisanal food. The basement houses the wine cellar, a chic and convivial space where you can pull bottles off the shelves lining the walls and enjoy them at the communal tables scattered around the cozy room, along with a menu of bar snacks like cheese, crostini and oysters.

Saturday

5. Medieval Cathedral | 10:30 a.m.

Much of Ireland’s history can be read in Christ Church Cathedral, which dates back to circa 1030. William of Orange came here to give thanks after he ensured the Protestant ascendancy at the Battle of the Boyne; it houses Strongbow’s tomb; and parts of the television series “The Tudors” were filmed inside (admission, 6 euros). The medieval crypt is full of treasures, including a mummified cat and rat discovered stuck in an organ pipe (so iconic they rate a mention in James Joyce’s “Finnegans Wake”). The belfry tour (4 euros; 11:30 a.m. and 1:15 p.m.) provides a beautiful view from the top and an up-close look at the flying buttresses, as well as the chance to try bell-ringing. If you want to go even farther back in time, get the combination ticket (13.25 euros) that includes the Dublinia museum, the Viking “experience” connected to Christ Church by bridge, where hokey but entertaining exhibits impart an extraordinary amount of information about Dublin’s beginnings as a Viking settlement.

Christchurch

6. Bikes by the Bridges | 1:30 p.m.

Dublin got a bike share program in 2009, and its enormous popularity (it’s now one of the most successful such programs in Europe) has led to the creation of a number of city center bike lanes and a cycling-friendly culture. Grab a bike from one of the many stations (locations at dublinbikes.ie; 5 euros for a three-day ticket after which every ride of 30 minutes or less is free) and cycle down the banks of the Liffey River, which slices through the city. Stop at one of Dublin’s famed bridges, each of which tells a story: the Ha’penny (the city’s first pedestrian bridge; payment to cross was once a halfpenny), the O’Connell (a part of Dublin life since 1794, said to be unique in Europe for being wider than it is long), and the newest, the Rosie Hackett (named for a trade union activist involved in the 1913 Lockout and the 1916 Easter Rising, and the first to be named after a woman since 1792).

7. Go for a Guinness | 3 p.m. ­

Craft beer may be the new thing, but a pint of “the black stuff” is still required drinking on any trip to Dublin. The enormous Guinness Storehouse museum (admission, 18 euros), set amid the cobbled streets and imposing buildings of the St. James’s Gate brewery, explains how the stout is made and gives the history of the company, along with a selection of the familiar “Guinness is good for you” advertisements. The best part of visiting the storehouse comes near the end, when an employee supervises visitors in pulling a proper pint of Guinness (it’s a strictly adhered-to method involving holding the glass at the correct 45-degree angle and waiting 119.5 seconds before topping it off). Take it up to the top floor Gravity Bar, where the 360-degree view of Dublin is worth lingering over.

8. Restaurant Renaissance | 7 p.m. ­

Forest Avenue is a new addition to Dublin’s booming culinary scene, and it might just have the most exciting food in the city. The owners, John and Sandy Wyer, opened this small, airy spot in November 2013, and it’s been getting rave reviews for its tasting menus. Dishes like a salad of Annagassan crab with smoked salmon and chilled zucchini, and beef carpaccio with smoked oyster mayonnaise, pickles and horseradish quietly impress with their flavor and innovation. Changes appear on the menu weekly, but with food at this high a standard, that’s just more reason to return. Dinner for two, about 120 euros.

9. Beyond ‘Trad’ Music | 9 p.m. ­

Live music is in Dublin’s blood, but just about the only Irish accents you’d hear in a city center pub advertising traditional music are either on the stage or behind the bar. Leave the renditions of “The Fields of Athenry” for the countryside and head instead to the Sugar Club, a central venue with an eclectic calendar of live music and a fun-loving vibe. Anything from indie-folk to soul to country music to hip-hop can be found most nights of the week, along with the occasional high-energy comedy, burlesque or cabaret night.

Sunday

10. ­Go North | 11 a.m.

The “north side” of Dublin (meaning north of the Liffey) has traditionally been more working class than the upscale south side. A stroll around offers glimpses into lives that haven’t changed much in half a century, from the hawkers selling fruit from baby carriages to the elderly ladies pulling their wheeled shopping bags behind them. Begin with a coffee and homemade pastry at Brother Hubbard, a bright and welcoming cafe on Capel Street then stroll down Henry Street, the north side’s main shopping precinct. At O’Connell Street, check out the towering silver Spire of Dublin, built for the millennium and nicknamed, in classic Dublin fashion, “the stiletto in the ghetto.” It’s just up the street from the General Post Office, an earlier incarnation of which was occupied by rebellion leaders during the 1916 Easter Rising. Whether the holes in its pillars are bullet holes from that historic conflict has been long debated, but even the suggestion is enough to stimulate the imagination.

11. ­Gaelic Games | 3:30 p.m.

There are a few “Gaelic games” unique to Ireland, and two of them are played at Croke Park, Dublin’s 82,300-capacity stadium. Gaelic football, which has the highest attendance of any sport in Ireland, is played with a ball similar to a soccer ball that can be picked up as well as kicked, while hurling, possibly the fastest field sport in the world, uses wooden sticks called hurleys and a small leather ball that can reach speeds of 100 miles per hour. The atmosphere at a Sunday afternoon match — matches are played March through September; admission 10 to 15 euros (standing and seated) — spent cheering on teams from all over Ireland in the company of their passionate fans, is unbeatable.

LODGING

The Marker (Grand Canal Square, Docklands) is Dublin’s hottest new hotel, drawing trendsetters to its rooftop bar and tourists to its comfy, colorful, modern rooms. It’s part of the Daniel Libeskind-designed Grand Canal Square in Dublin’s new tech hub.

The Marker Rooftop

Dating back to 1824, the Shelbourne (27 St. Stephen’s Green) is an elegant historic hotel overlooking St. Stephen’s Green. Its Horseshoe Bar is a Dublin landmark; anyone who’s ever been anyone in Ireland has stopped here for a drink.

 

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Arthur Guinness Day™

Arthur Guinness Day™

Arthur Guinness was a man who made great things happen, he created a beer that is still beloved by the world 250 years later.
That’s why on 26th and 27th of September, Guinness fans around the world will come together at a series of exciting musical events to raise a glass to Arthur and celebrate those who like him, make great things happen.
From the talented musicians that take the stage on the day, to the worthy awardees of the Arthur Guinness Fund, to the many thousands of Guinness fans all around the world, people are coming together on September 26th and 27th to paint the town black.
So, this Arthur Guinness Day™, come and join the thousands of people around the world who are raising a glass to toast those who make things happen.

Arthur’s Day 2013

The GUINNESS team is excited to announce details of Arthur’s Day 2013, which will take place on Thursday26th September. Arthur’s Day will showcase the best of Ireland’s creativity and talent from the world of music and culture at over 500 free music events and creative showcases in pubs across the island of Ireland.

The Arthur’s Day line-up will see a variety of artists play in pubs across the island of Ireland, from the best and brightest of Ireland’s musical talent including The Script, James Vincent McMorrow, The Original Rudeboys, Girl Band and Bouts; to internationally acclaimed artists such as Manic Street Preachers, Emeli Sandé, Janelle Monae and the legendary Bobby Womack. Further artists will be announced later in the summer.

As always Arthur’s Day will be a night full of surprises with acts turning up unannounced to perform in pubs. Some acts will also perform at one of five ticketed music events, taking place in pubs across Belfast, Dublin, Limerick and Cork.

The Script commented; “We can’t wait for Arthur’s Day. We are particularly delighted to see that emerging Irish artists will have such a fantastic opportunity to perform alongside some of the more established names on the line up. Having such a huge stage to perform on will undoubtedly be of benefit to the incredibly talented, up and coming artists and we’re really looking forward to sharing the stage with them”. Emeli Sandé said; “I am really excited to perform at this year’s Arthur’s Day. I’ve heard that the atmosphere is electric so I’m looking forward to taking to the stage on the night”. This year, Arthur’s Day will support, promote and showcase the next generation of Ireland’s musical talent, artists, poets, writers and culinary experts; all of whom are creating and inspiring positive change in Ireland today. GUINNESS will collaborate with publicans and Arthur Guinness Project applicants to transform some local pubs into creative hubs.

On Arthur’s Day, THE GUINNESS STOREHOUSE at St. James’s Gate Brewery will be transformed into a cultural hub showcasing Ireland’s talent and creativity across the four areas of Music, Arts, Food and Sport. There is still time to vote for your favourite projects on http://www.arthurguinnessprojects.com , the top 10% of which will go to our Arthur Guinness Projects Panel for review with winning applicants receiving up to €50,000 in funding alongside mentoring and support from the panel. Voting closes on Friday 23rd August.

Commenting at the launch, Stephen O’ Kelly, Marketing Director, Guinness said; “Guinness has a long tradition of supporting and promoting emerging talent in Ireland through Arthur’s Day programmes such as ‘Play on the Day’, ‘Our Thursdays’ and the recently launched Arthur Guinness Projects, a major cultural initiative which is championing people whose ideas, passion and spirit are enhancing and shaping our culture and identity. Whilst music will continue to be the cornerstone of the day, this year, our creative canvass will stretch well beyond music, embracing other aspects of our culture by showcasing talent and creativity from sport and food to the arts and design.”

Ireland will join the millions of people taking part in the Arthur’s Day 2013 celebrations across Europe, Indonesia, Malaysia, The Caribbean and Australia.

 

For more information you can visit Guinness.com and check out the link below: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwpd5uMaXNM&feature=youtu.be