The 16 remaining original Victorian era pubs of Dublin

Millions of people flock to Dublin every year for a chance to see up close, just what makes a Dublin pub so special. For most, the older the better. There is no shortage of authentically traditional pubs in the city, but as the decades go by, the numbers drop. Some of the best pubs in Dublin were built in the Victorian era, which stretched from 1837 to 1901. Many of these remain to this day and retain the majority of their original fixtures and their Victorian characteristics.

In Kevin C. Kearns’ ‘Dublin pub life and lore’, he lists the remaining Victorian pubs still in operation today. Sincethe book was published, 2 have closed down, Conways on Parnell street and Regans on Tara street. Here we will go through the remaining pubs and just why they are worth preserving and why they are part of Dublin’s rich heritage and remain some of the best places to go for a pint.

Interesting to note is that most of these pubs have snugs, which are a rare sight in modern pubs.

The Palace bar, Fleet street

palace

The Palace bar is still richly celebrated as one of the most traditional bars in the city, drawing in tourists from the Temple Bar area looking for a more authentic experience. A pub where writers, journalists, artists, and others have congregated for decades. They still have a great tradition of supporting the GAA and traditional music. They have a lovely traditional snug and have moved with the times by offering a good selection of Irish craft beer.

Toners, Baggot street

toners

Toners has a reputation of having one of the best pints of Guinness in the city according to Rory Guinness, a descendant of Arthur. It still retains its character on the inside and they have tried to recreate it in their newer beer garden. The snug was in recent years voted best in the country.

Doheny and Nesbitt, Baggot street

doheny

A pub mostly associated with journalists and the local business crowd, Dohenys is still very much traditional. It’s a big rugby pub, and they also have traditional music from Sunday to Tuesday nights.

 

The Swan, Aungier street

One of our favourite pubs in the city. The fixtures remain the same, and they proudly boast of their status as a Victorian era heritage pub. You can still see signs behind the bar that advertise ‘Colour TV available here’ from when the bar started to modernise in terms of what they offer.

 

The Long Hall, Georges street

One of the quintessential Dublin pubs for those visiting and looking for a bit of tradition. Bruce Springsteen is known to drink here when he’s in town, and who could argue with his taste. The walls are decorated with muskets, antique clocks, and other period paraphernalia. A Dublin classic.

 

Slatterys, Capel street

Slatterys is listed in the book as being a Victorian era pub, but there have been some recent renovations. These were mostly of the upper floor, so it shouldn’t affect the pubs Victorian status. It is also one of the few remaining early houses in the city, opening early in the morning for those who work unsociable hours.

 

The Stag’s Head, Dame Lane

stags

The jewel in the crown of the Louis Fitzgerald pub group, and one of the most recognisable pub names in the city. There’s a large snug room behind the bar that is extremely cosy and retains a stained glass ceiling. If you see footage of the pub from the 60s and 70s you could barely tell the difference to today, bar the increase in taps on the counter.

 

Ryans, Parkgate street

ryansparkgate

Also known as Bongo Ryans, it has one of the most sought after snugs in the city. Like all Victorian pubs, it features large ornately carved wooden dividers that break up the bar.

 

The International Bar, Exchequer street

Best known as the home of stand up comedy in the city. The main bar is quite a small space, but it’s one of the most homely in the city.

Gaffneys, Fairview

The Hut, Phibsboro

Bowes, Fleet street

bowesfront

Bowes recently reopened their new snug after a bit of a refurb. Plans were underway to expand the bar into the neighbouring Doyles and ladbrokes, but the planning permission was turned down. this may well be a good thing for admirers of Bowes, as it will retain all the makes it good.

Kehoes, South Anne street

Such is the popularity of Kehoes, it can be hard to get a seat in this well worn and well loved pub. When full, it can appear to be a bit of a mazey design, with creaking stairs taking you to areas you wouldn’t expect existed. The snug beside the bar to the left as you walk in is a fine place to meet with friends.

Finnegans, Dalkey

 

Cassidys, Camden street

Come in here on a Sunday after an All Ireland final and you’ll fear for the safety of the structure! It heaves with fans adoring both the victorious Dubs and this fine pub. Bill Clinton stopped in here for a pint in the 90s on a presidential visit.

 

The Norseman, East Essex street

When the book we are referencing from was published, this pub was known as The Norseman, it then became Farringtons, and it has now reverted back to The Norseman. A fine treat for visitors to Temple Bar to be able to have a pint in an original Victorian era pub.

There are a number of other pubs that have strong characteristics of the Victorian age, but are not clasically Victorian, including…

  • Mulligans Poolbeg street
  • Mulligans Stoneybatter
  • Hanlons North Circular road
  • Kavanaghs Aughrim street
  • The Gravediggers Glasnevin
  • McDaids Harry street
  • The Lord Edward Christchurch
  • The Portobello Rathmines
  • Slatterys Rathmines
  • The Brazen Head Bridge street
  • Searsons Baggot street
  • Sandyford House

 

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Dublin named world’s third friendliest city (and No.6 isn’t bad either)

Dublin and Galway have been named among the world’s ten friendliest cities by readers of Condé Nast Traveler.

“The people make the place here,” said one reader of Dublin.

The city placed third on the list, behind Charleston in South Carolina and Sydney, Australia – and just ahead of Queenstown, New Zealand.

Dublin Hapenny bridge

“We had the best recommendations on where to go and what to see from the locals,” said another visitor. “Better than any guide book.”
“I’ve never been somewhere with friendlier drinkers,” added a third.

Condé Nast Traveler’s Top 10 friendliest cities:

  • Charleston, South Carolina
  • Sydney, Australia
  • Dublin, Ireland
  • Queenstown, New Zealand
  • Park City, Utah
  • Galway, Ireland
  • Savannah, Georgia
  • Krakow, Poland
  • Bruges, Belgium
  • Nashville, Tennessee
    The list was complied based on Conde Nast Traveler’s Readers’ Choice Survey, taken by some 128,000 readers in 2015, according to the magazine.

“Just look at this city,” it says of Galway. “It’s hard not to be charmed.”
Live music, pubs and food “enchanted” its readers, the travel bible adds. “These are the friendliest people I have ever met,” commented one reader.

Galway was named the world’s friendliest city by readers of another US publication, Travel + Leisure, last year, with Dublin ranking third and Cork fourth.
“Again and again, our research shows us that the friendliness of our people is one of our unique selling points,” said Niall Gibbons, CEO of Tourism Ireland.

“It is the warm welcome and the ‘craic’ here that resonates with our overseas visitors and makes our cities, and the island of Ireland, such a great choice for a short break or holiday.”
Meanwhile, Condé Nast Traveler’s list of the world’s unfriendliest cities was topped by Newark, followed by Tijuana, Mexico and Oakland in California.

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Ireland named one of world’s Top 10 summer destinations, thanks to three ‘luxury’ counties.

Ballyfin House Co. Laois 5

$35 billion question

An analysis of $35 billion worth of travel transactions has seen Ireland named one of the world’s hottest destinations to visit this summer.

Luxury travel network Virtuoso, which last summer named Ashford Castle as the world’s best hotel, lists its 10 hottest destinations as follows:

  1. Italy
  2. UK
  3. France
  4. Spain
  5. Netherlands
  6. Ireland
  7. Germany
  8. South Africa
  9. Greece
  10. Israel

The list comes after an analysis of travel-related transactions in North America ahead of summer 2016, Virtuoso says, and shows a 58% increase in Irish bookings.

“Travellers visiting Ireland are flocking to Dublin and Galway in particular,” it says, “along with County Laois in the centre of the country.”
Laois is home to the 5-star Heritage Resort and Ballyfin, where Kanye West and Kim Kardashian are reported to have honeymooned in 2014.

“It’s another well-deserved accolade, which provides Tourism Ireland with a great hook to continue to promote the island of Ireland as a ‘must visit’ destination for American and Canadian travellers,” said Alison Metcalfe of Tourism Ireland.

2015 was Ireland’s busiest ever year for inbound tourism, with first quarter results for 2016 showing North American visits up 24.5pc.

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EPIC Ireland: Inside Dublin’s epic new €15 million tourist attraction

A deep dive into Irish DNA

Epic-Logo-FingerprintEPIC Ireland is described as an interactive visitor experience celebrating the global journeys and influence of the Irish disapora.
Opening to the public on May 7 after an official launch by Mary Robinson, the attraction is set in the brick vaults of CHQ on Custom House Quay.

It is entirely privately funded, developed at a cost of €15 million by Neville Isdell, former Chairman and CEO of Coca Cola and member of the Irish diaspora.
On a preview tour, my experience was of a bold series of 20 galleries slickly fitted with at times breathtakingly immersive technology-driven displays.

Designed by Event Communications, the award-winning designers of Titanic Belfast, EPIC Ireland aspires to tell the story of “10 million journeys”, with galleries organised into themes of migration, motivation, influence and connection.

epic ireland

Why did people leave? What was their influence overseas? How has the emigrant experience changed over time? All are questions integral to the experience.

“The vision and objective of EPIC Ireland is to be the essential first port of call for visitors to Ireland,” said its Managing Director, Conal Harvey.
75pc of visitors are expected to come from overseas, with 25pc coming from the island of Ireland, according to Dervla O’Neill, its head of marketing.

She described the experience as “a real deep dive into the Irish DNA”.
Visitors receive a passport as they enter the attraction, stamping it at various points before using it to send a virtual postcard as their tour concludes.

Some 70 living characters are included among the galleries, ranging from Magdelene daughter Mari Steed to Graham Norton and President Barack Obama.

A rogues’ gallery evokes characters like Ned Kelly and Typhoid Mary, whilst others celebrate the achievements of scientists like Ernest Walton, musicians like Morrissey, and literary giants ranging from Bram Stoker to Edna O’Brien.

epic_23

(…)
All told, however, this is a much-needed and extremely polished addition to Dublin’s deck of tourist attractions – at a time when the city is badly in need of new competitive edges to re-position a somewhat tiring image.
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American College Football to bring much more than a game to Dublin in September

Boston College's game with Georgia Tech in the Aviva Stadium was announced last June, but on Thursday morning in Trinity College the full scale of what the game will bring to Dublin was finally revealed.

BC_GT_Header

The two teams are to meet in the Aer Lingus College Football Classic on September 3rd in the opening game of the college football season. The game will have a 12:30pm kickoff, meaning an early morning start for fans of the colleges on America’s west coast.

20,000 tickets have already been sold for the game, almost all in America. Game organisers expect that at least 50% of those in attendance will be American who will travel to Dublin from the Boston and Atlanta areas.

Aviva_stadium

ESPN will broadcast from Dublin during the game and organisers hope to the station’s flagship program SportsCenter will be based in Dublin in the lead-up to the event. The program is one of the most popular sports shows on American television.

Trinity College will also host three high school games in the build-up to the event with teams from Georgia, Florida and New Jersey. The University will act as a Welcome Village for fans from both colleges in the week building up to the game, including the colleges pep rallies ahead of the game.

Game Promoter Padraic O’Kane told Newstalk Sport that the event is a brilliant way to promote Dublin and it’s surrounds. “Compared to most major events that come in, sporting events that come into Dublin like a rugby international are gone again. These people will fly into Shannon and Belfast and will spend time in towns and cities around the country. This is not only a win for Dublin but it’s a huge win for Ireland.”

O’Kane claims the Dublin is now the “European Capital of College Football” as the city prepares to host the third college football game in the city in five years. “The great thing about college universities coming to Ireland is every aspect of the school wins.”

The game takes place on the same weekend as the All-Ireland Hurling Final, and O’Kane feels that a lack of beds wont be an issue in Dublin at the start of September.

The American Ambassador to Ireland Kevin O’Malley was also in attendance, at the St. Louis native is delighted to attend the event in Dublin.

“It will be the first football game of the year, it will get a lot of coverage” in America according to Ambassador O’Malley. “It’s a big thing. ESPN is coming over to cover it. They are going to do a number of hours of pre-game. The will show the spectacle of what an American College Football pre-game is.”

Ambassador O’Malley doesn’t have an affiliation with either team and he hopes to see “an American spectacle” in Dublin. At the moment, the ambassador does not have an official role in the game but jokingly added he could play for either team if they needed “a very old corner back”.Tickets for the game go on sale to Irish fans on April 6th at 9am on ticketmaster.ie

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